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loose threads from
www.dvafoto.com

by Matt Lutton and M. Scott Brauer

yingangphoto:

We sell rice downstairs.

My father has lived and worked in this shophouse on and off since 1955. There are about 5 or 6 typewriters scattered around, a bicycle from the late fifties from the office boy (who still works for us, and who is still referred to as the office boy even though he’s in his 60s now), an abacus that was probably used to count the first dollars that came through the business and a single bed that my dad bought and assembled himself in case I ever wanted to sleepover.

I come to this “office” whenever I make a trip to Singapore. My dad and I trek up the musty stairs to his personal quarters at the top of the shophouse and by the time we reach his room, it’s so hot that he immediately has to strip down to his underwear in an attempt to cool off. It was 38 degrees in that room today. 50% humidity. 

I sit next to him and we talk about the news. He shows me videos on youtube. I read the paper and he plays solitaire for a while. I love being there with him. It’s a part of me. This place forms the foundation of my personal history that began before I took my first breaths, back when my father was a boy and when his parents were desperately and tenaciously sweating their way out of a pre-industrial poverty.

Now he is an old man and inasmuch as he still kicks my ass at tennis and golf, I am aware.. oh so aware of the passing of time, the aging of men and things, the dust collected on surfaces and the typewriters (how I love those typewriters) sitting unused and at the end of their ribbon. 

The office boy is on leave today. His mother passed away a few days ago so he’s not coming back to work until next week. I open one of the drawers beneath an old television in my late grandfather’s office. There is a microphone plugged into a pale gold console. I turn to my dad with a questioning look. He smiles and tells me that the office boy comes in after working hours, when he thinks that everyone has gone home, and sings karaoke here by himself. Old Chinese love songs from the 70s.

futurejournalismproject:

Rwanda, 20 Years Later
Twenty years ago this week, the Rwandan genocide began. It’s estimated 800,000 to a million people were killed over 100 days. Most were Tutsi but tens of thousands were moderate Hutu and others caught in the slaughter.
The country today is commemorating by holding a week of mourning alongside a longer 100-day vigil.
The #Rwanda20yrs hashtag on Twitter is an at times sobering, enlightening and inspiring access point to news, resources and personal accounts of the period.
Here’s some of what we’ve been reading through:
BBC, Rwanda genocide: 100 days of slaughter; a backgrounder on the events.
BBC, A good man in Rwanda; the story of Mbaye Diagne, an unarmed, Senegalese peacekeeper with the UN, who’s credited with saving at least 500 Rwandans.
Thomson Reuters Foundation, Genocide and Justice: Rwanda 20 years on; an immersive site with first person accounts from survivors, perpetrators, diplomats and more.
The Guardian, Genocide in Rwanda was a fork in the road not just for Africa but the world; how the genocide has affected international law and world response to events today.
Slate, Unreconciled Rwanda; can survivors really forgive those that murdered family and loved ones, and what policies has the Rwandan government put in place to foster reconciliation attempts.
Image: Via National Geographic, “A man tries to unlock a cell door at a hospital in Kigali, Rwanda in 1994. As the genocide spread across the country, doctors and staff of the main psychological hospital in Kigali fled or were killed leaving the patients to care for themselves.” Photo by David Guttenfelder. Revisiting the Rwandan Genocide: Origin Stories From The Associated Press. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Rwanda, 20 Years Later

Twenty years ago this week, the Rwandan genocide began. It’s estimated 800,000 to a million people were killed over 100 days. Most were Tutsi but tens of thousands were moderate Hutu and others caught in the slaughter.

The country today is commemorating by holding a week of mourning alongside a longer 100-day vigil.

The #Rwanda20yrs hashtag on Twitter is an at times sobering, enlightening and inspiring access point to news, resources and personal accounts of the period.

Here’s some of what we’ve been reading through:

Image: Via National Geographic, “A man tries to unlock a cell door at a hospital in Kigali, Rwanda in 1994. As the genocide spread across the country, doctors and staff of the main psychological hospital in Kigali fled or were killed leaving the patients to care for themselves.” Photo by David Guttenfelder. Revisiting the Rwandan Genocide: Origin Stories From The Associated Press. Select to embiggen.

(via committeetoprotectjournalists)

kiehart:

Church of 8 Wheels : San Francisco, California : March 19, 2014 (Photos Copyright Pete Kiehart/The San Francisco Chronicle)

This has quickly become one of my favorite places.

For further reading about David Miles Jr., who was super helpful when I was working on this, and the magical place he’s created, click here. Or better, yet, just show up: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at Fell & Fillmore.

newyorker:

A look at photos from Michael Somoroff’s unconventional homage to the German photographer August Sander: http://nyr.kr/1fzrMw3

Top: “Pastrycook,” 1928. Photograph by August Sander.
Bottom: Photograph by Michael Somoroff.

August Sander photographs © Die Photographische Sammlung/SK-Stiftung Kultur - August Sander Archiv, Cologne - VG-Bild Kunst, Bonn, 2011.

(Source: newyorker.com)

From FeatureShoot: “We’re not gonna lie, we were worried this was some sort of kitty vending machine, but it’s actually a shot of a cat’s version of backstage, captured by Amsterdam-based photographer Rene van der Hulst back in 2002 at the Hoogvliet Circus near Rotterdam in the Netherlands. The cats were part of an act by a dwarf duo that had trained the cats to do a myriad of tricks. Van der Hulst happened upon the stars of the show just before going onstage, and was quite taken by the surreal nature of these felines waiting to perform—he assured us, too, that these little guys only spent a short time in their backstage quarters.”
Photos by Rene van der Hulst

From FeatureShoot: “We’re not gonna lie, we were worried this was some sort of kitty vending machine, but it’s actually a shot of a cat’s version of backstage, captured by Amsterdam-based photographer Rene van der Hulst back in 2002 at the Hoogvliet Circus near Rotterdam in the Netherlands. The cats were part of an act by a dwarf duo that had trained the cats to do a myriad of tricks. Van der Hulst happened upon the stars of the show just before going onstage, and was quite taken by the surreal nature of these felines waiting to perform—he assured us, too, that these little guys only spent a short time in their backstage quarters.”
Photos by Rene van der Hulst

Read and consider the reactions, and how ridiculous and sexist many of them were.

Read and consider the reactions, and how ridiculous and sexist many of them were.

(Source: yimmyayo, via yingangphoto)