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loose threads from
www.dvafoto.com

by Matt Lutton and M. Scott Brauer

mmepastel:

Yusuf Sevincli est un photographe turc. Il a fait une série appelée Home qu’il n’a pas retenu sur son site officiel. Et pourtant. Il était retourné dans sa ville natale (ce qu’explique le texte ci dessous pris à NPR), au nord de la Turquie, sur les côtes de la Mer Noire où il avait également passé toute son enfance. Il explique que cette expérience lui a fait se poser des questions car tout lui semblait étranger. Il s’est demandé si c’étaient les lieux qui avaient changé ou lui-même.

"The photographs in my series Home were taken in the town of Zonguldak, a small city in northern Turkey on the coast of the Black Sea, where I was born and spent more than half my life. I started photographing when I returned many years later for a weekend visit; I found myself confronted with questions about my past and belonging. The places where I spent my childhood had become complete strangers to me, and I set out to recapture the fragments of past events that marked my memories of home. Was it really me who existed in these places so long ago? Has Zonguldak changed, or had I ?"

Ben Vautier

(Terrain Vague, 1961, 1970 / Partie Du Tout A Ben, 1960 / Le Temps, 1961 / To Change Art Destroy Ego, 1965, 1968 / Centre Du Monde, 1962 / Jeter Dieu a la Mer, 1962 / Voiture, ca. 1964-65 / Voiture, ca. 1964-65 / Le Vitres De Magazins, 1979 )

From Strip Tease Intégral de Ben (Rétrospective Ben [Vautier]), Somogy editions d’art/ MAC Lyon, Paris/Lyon, 2010 (french language)

(Source: stoppingoffplace.blogspot.ca, via gregruffing)

fotojournalismus:

Dmitry GombergAkrak Vazha (The Shepherd’s Way)

Artist’s statement: 

"This is a story about Tusheti - mountain region in the Republic of Georgia. Tusheti lies near the Chechen border and it is culturally closer to Chechens than to Georgians.

The story is about shepherds who travel every summer to their ancestors’ land Tusheti and than return to spend the winter at the bottom of the mountain. Twice a year they travel with their sheep through the pass in the Caucasus which is 3,000 meters high. 

I was staying and documenting life of the Shepherds in the Caucasus mountains for 5 years. These people have been cheese makers since before Christ. Their life is simple and harsh, but beautiful.”

(via 5centsapound)

Good Answer

davidsimonton:

Question: You’ve made color photographs since the 1940s, but since 1976 you’ve been working exclusively in color. Why did you change over from black and white, in which you’d worked for so long?

Harry Callahan: [One reason is that] In 1976 I had a big retrospective at the Museum of Modern…

coverjunkie:

Illustration by Matt Dorfman

Newest cover The New York Times Magazine

New York Times Magazine also carries an ace blog called “The 6th Floor” , a fun read. 

Gail Bichler: Design Director
Kathy Ryan: Director of Photography
Designers: Raul Aguila , Ben Grandgenett and Jason Sfetko 
Design Associate: Audrey Rodriguez

coverjunkie:

Illustration by Matt Dorfman

Newest cover The New York Times Magazine

New York Times Magazine also carries an ace blog called “The 6th Floor” , a fun read.

Gail Bichler: Design Director
Kathy Ryan: Director of Photography
Designers: Raul Aguila , Ben Grandgenett and Jason Sfetko
Design Associate: Audrey Rodriguez

likeafieldmouse:

Trevor Paglen - They Watch the Moon (2010)

"This photograph depicts a classified ‘listening station’ deep in the forests of West Virginia.

The station is located at the center of the National Radio Quiet Zone, a region of approximately 34,000 square kilometers in West Virginia and parts of Maryland.

Within the Quiet Zone, radio transmissions are severely restricted: omnidirectional and high-powered transmissions (such as wireless internet devices and FM radio stations) are not permitted.

The listening station, which forms part of the global ECHELON system, was designed in part to take advantage of a phenomenon called moonbounce.

Moonbounce involves capturing communications and telemetry signals from around the world as they escape into space, hit the moon, and are reflected back towards Earth.

The photograph is a long exposure under the full moon light.”

(via gregruffing)