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loose threads from
www.dvafoto.com

by Matt Lutton and M. Scott Brauer

johnvink:

Resting Before The Next Move…

The evicted villagers from Lor Peang (Kampong Tralach, Kampong Chhnang) are staying with the Boeung Kak lake land rights activists since a few weeks. They have no other place to go anyhow. It allows them to reach those in charge and put pressure on them to find a solution to their issue. And as a bonus here they are learning the tricks of the protest trade through the experienced advice of the Boeung Kak ladies.

This is a follow-up post on the ‘Quest for Land’ story which is available as an iApp on iTunes and which reports on land issues in Cambodia since the year 2000 with texts by Robert Carmichael and over 700 photographs. At THIS link.

(Source: johnvink.com)

instagram:

Mapping the Geography of Poverty with @mattblack_blackmatt in California’s Central Valley

To see more scenes from the California Central Valley and learn more about The Geography of Poverty project, follow @mattblack_blackmatt on Instagram.

Photojournalist Matt Black (@mattblack_blackmatt) shares stark black and white images from the farmlands of California’s rural Central Valley, where he was born and raised.

“It just hasn’t seemed right for me to go to some far-flung place when there are so many stories and important things to do right around me,” he explains.

To convey the impact of years of drought and economic hardship, Matt launched the Geography of Poverty project on Instagram, where he weaves together a landscape of photos, census data and map coordinates.

“I’m trying to portray a certain environment, to build a world,” he continues. “The goal of the project is to quite literally put places on the map.”

As one of the founding members of EverydayUSA (@everydayusa), he now joins a dozen photographers who collaborate to share stories of life across the country. “Everyone is pursuing their own distinct thing,” says Matt, “but together the work is making a different sort of statement.”

paper-journal:

'…I have felt in the past few years this hype where someone at the top of the cultural pyramid says, ‘This is a great book,’ and then everyone rushes out and gets it, but I don’t know if people even look at it to decide whether or not it’s great for themselves' - Stephen Gill, studio visit for Paper Journal 


(via conscientious)

guardian:

The Scottish referendum explained for non-Brits (ie most of you reading this) 

• Follow the referendum live - get the latest »

This is good.

newyorker:

On average, people in Japan live longer than people anywhere else in the world, and they live longer in the city of Nagano than in anywhere else in Japan. A look at James Whitlow Delano’s photographs.

Top: The Nakajima family takes a lunch break in their apple orchard, Wakaho, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Bottom: The ninety-six-year-old Mr. Kazu, a veteran of the Second World War, Nakano, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Photographs by James Whitlow Delano.

(Source: newyorker.com)

nonafaustine:

No one captured Harlem like James Van Der Zee. When you say Harlem the ghosts of yesterday still live in the hearts and minds of many. Conjuring this iconic image of a glamourous couple in raccoon coats, flossin beside their Cadillac. Upward moblility and the intellgencia grows out of the cracks between the concrete. Where even the street people debate politics, while the sounds of ole rhythm and blues oozes out of establishments on to the sidewalk. -Nona Photo, James Van Der Zee, 1932

nonafaustine:

No one captured Harlem like James Van Der Zee. When you say Harlem the ghosts of yesterday still live in the hearts and minds of many. Conjuring this iconic image of a glamourous couple in raccoon coats, flossin beside their Cadillac. Upward moblility and the intellgencia grows out of the cracks between the concrete. Where even the street people debate politics, while the sounds of ole rhythm and blues oozes out of establishments on to the sidewalk. -Nona 

Photo, James Van Der Zee, 1932

(via photographsonthebrain)

fotojournalismus:

Festival of the Good Death Celebrated in Cachoeira, Brazil

The Afro-Brazilian Sisterhood of the Good Death is made up of female descendants of slaves, all age 50 and over, and honours both Catholic traditions and Afro-Brazilian Candomble religious rites. The sisterhood is believed to be the oldest organization for women of African descent in the Americas. The state of Bahia received at least 1.2 million slaves from Africa and remains the most African of Brazilian states, where blacks make up around 80 percent of the population.

Photos by Mario Tama/Getty Images — August 14-17, 2014.

Nemanja Knezevic in Sarajevo

Nemanja Knezevic in Sarajevo

(Source: cibzar)