dvafoto.tumblr

loose threads from
www.dvafoto.com

by Matt Lutton and M. Scott Brauer

magnumfoundation:

With support from MF Emergency Fund, I am continuing work on my project about the causes and consequences of violence in Venezuela. My explorations of the current situation in Caracas, San Cristobal and other cities in Venezuela have helped me understand the close relationship between the everyday violence that stifles the country – the thousands of murders, robberies and kidnappings per year – and the rise of political extremism. San Cristobal is now the forefront of a political struggle and clashes between government forces and opposition activists.

Although it is not a “popular revolt,” there is a widespread, diverse, organized movement made up of progressive center-leftists, traditional parties, and extreme right wing activists. The opposition aims to garner media attention to portray what is happening in the country to show Venezuelans that things are far from normal.

The situation in San Cristobal has gone from bad to worse. The elevated middle class of this Andean city is completely blocked off by a solid system of barricades that can reach up to three meters high. The protesters organize themselves into teams to defend their “free zone.” With stones, Molotov cocktails, and homemade explosive devices they spend all night vigilantly patrolling the streets; violent skirmishes have taken the lives of 38 people to date.

Amidst the turmoil, the opposition is primarily made up of a group of young people, some of them practically kids, who demand social progress and who are fighting, with little guidance, for goals they don’t completely understand. Many of them have the conviction and the motivation, despite a government that sees them as the enemy. They continue to fight solely for the right to be heard.

San Cristobal, Venezuela

5 Questions for John Francis Peters (interview by Peter Hoffman)

apadblog:

image

John Francis Peters is a Los Angeles based photographer specializing in documentary, portrait, travel and lifestyle projects. John’s diverse body of work ranges from the portraiture of influential personalities to essays on emerging culture and environments in transition. His personal and…

nprradiopictures:

guardian:

The iconic Boston bombing photograph isn’t about my legs – it’s about a rescue - Jeff Bauman 

I remember when the photograph was taken. The famous one, I mean. The one of me being rushed from the Boston Marathon bombing without my legs. Only seconds before, a stranger named Carlos Arrendondo had lifted me from the ground, thrown me into a wheelchair, and started running.
There was so much smoke, and so much blood, and then suddenly it was clear, and a man was there, crouching in the road, pointing a camera at us. I thought, Why isn’t he helping? People are dying. Read more

Photograph: Charles Krupa / AP

“I glanced at the photo once, about a week after the bombing. I knew immediately I never wanted to look at it again. I never have, and I don’t think I ever will. I have enough images from that day in my head already. I don’t need another one.” - Jeff Bauman.

nprradiopictures:

guardian:

The iconic Boston bombing photograph isn’t about my legs – it’s about a rescue - Jeff Bauman 

I remember when the photograph was taken. The famous one, I mean. The one of me being rushed from the Boston Marathon bombing without my legs. Only seconds before, a stranger named Carlos Arrendondo had lifted me from the ground, thrown me into a wheelchair, and started running.

There was so much smoke, and so much blood, and then suddenly it was clear, and a man was there, crouching in the road, pointing a camera at us. I thought, Why isn’t he helping? People are dying. Read more

Photograph: Charles Krupa / AP

I glanced at the photo once, about a week after the bombing. I knew immediately I never wanted to look at it again. I never have, and I don’t think I ever will. I have enough images from that day in my head already. I don’t need another one.” - Jeff Bauman.

(Source: theguardian.com)

humanrightswatch:

Egypt: Failure to Meet US Aid Conditions

The US should acknowledge in its certification review for resuming certain military aid that Egypt has made no progress on developing basic freedoms or on its democratic transition.

Since assuming power on July 3, 2013, Egypt’s military-backed government has killed well over 1,000 protesters and locked up more than 16,000 people, many solely on the basis of their peaceful exercise of rights to free expression, association, and peaceful assembly. The mass death sentences handed down by an Egyptian court to 529 alleged members of the Muslim Brotherhood on March 24, in a trial lacking even basic elements of due process, is but one example of an escalating climate of extreme political repression.

“The question is no longer whether Egypt is on the road to democratic transition, but how much of its brute repression the US will paper over,” said Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “An accurate appraisal of Egypt’s record since the military-backed overthrow of President Morsy would conclude that, far from developing basic freedoms, the Egyptian authorities are doing the opposite.”

Photo 1: Al Jazeera English journalist Mohamed Fahmy, a Canadian-Egyptian national, stands in a metal cage during his trial in Cairo on March 24, 2014. © 2014 Reuters

Photo 2: Al Jazeera English journalist Peter Greste of Australia stands in a metal cage during his trial in Cairo on March 24, 2014. © 2014 Reuters